10 Ways to Avoid Electrical Shocks in Your Restaurant’s Kitchen

Bringing electricity into a wet environment can easily spell disaster. For restaurant kitchens, that combination is often an unavoidable threat.

When operating plug-in kitchen equipment and practicing regular hand washing, cooks can easily shock themselves if they’re not too careful. Frayed cords or poorly placed equipment can exacerbate the problem and put restaurant workers at a severe risk for electrocution and other serious injuries.

You can make a difference by providing proper training and instituting these 10 rules for dampening the risk of electrical shocks in the kitchen.

  1. Do not modify electrical cords or use them incorrectly.
  2. Do not operate kitchen appliances with wet hands or on wet surfaces.
  3. In wet areas such as near sinks or tubs, use only ground fault circuit interrupters (GFCI).
  4. Do not run extension cords between floor levels or through doorways.
  5. Train employees to unplug appliances by pulling on the plug and not the cord.
  6. Immediately fix or replace appliances if their cords are frayed, cut, missing ground prongs or have exposed wiring.
  7. Hard-wire items that will be powered on a long-term basis.
  8. Prevent grease from coming into contact with outlets to avoid short circuits.
  9. Use only cords, connection devices and fittings that are equipped with strain relief.
  10. Employ only factory-assembled, UL-Listed cord sets and 3-wire extension cords.

Backed by the Wisconsin, Iowa and Indiana Restaurant Associations, our restaurant coverage protects you from your industry’s unique risks. From spoilage protection to our no-wait business interruption coverage, we take away the worry so you can focus on what you do best: taking care of your customers. To learn how Society gets the details right for you, contact your local independent Society agent today.

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